What Should I Take Abroad With Me?

What should I leave at home?
Should I mail stuff to myself?

Taking32
Take only what you really really (really!) must. Humping heavy stuff around the world is no fun at all. Especially, as it seems you will only arrive on very hot and steamy days or in the middle of an ice storm, neither of which is a lot of fun for “humping” stuff around!

Medicine

Okay, I’m an older guy so I always think about what medicine I need that I can’t find over there. Ask on discussion boards. but don’t always trust the answers (well . . . never 100% trust the answers on ANY forum about anything).

Generally speaking though most medicines are much cheaper overseas, so don’t bother to stockpile. Unless the medicine you need/want is unusual or very new, it will most likely be easy to find where you are going.

Take What is Critical

Anything critical for maintaining your health, bring it with you.

Other Stuff

Bring only the basics in clothing, you’ll find you can get by with far less than you are used to. Bring a few special photos of family and friends.

Teaching Stuff

Bring one or two reference books. Books are heavy and bulky, but they are often quite expensive overseas and sometimes hard to come by.

But. . . with the Internet you don’t need them quite as much. You can look up almost everything online. And, even the most remote villages nowadays have Internet access (okay, an exaggeration!). But the Internet is available almost everywhere now.

To Bring a Computer or Not

Lots of people use moving as an excuse to pick up a nice notebook computer. To me, it just something to worry about having stolen. A cheap desktop where you are moving will cost you (usually) about half what your notebook will cost. But, prices can vary a lot so ask on the discussion boards or ask your new school. And, often, pirated software (I’m NOT advocating this) is loaded onto these desktops for free or a tiny fraction of what you would pay at home for the same stuff.

Get a big portable external hard drive, load all your essential stuff on it, and bring that instead. It’s a whole lot less trouble!

Mailing Stuff

Not recommended. Things get lost, things get stolen, things don’t arrive. If you really need it, put it in your suitcase. If it is critical, carry it onboard with you.

TED’s Tips™ #1: Most of the world gets by with FAR LESS STUFF than Westerners are used to requiring. In the village where I live I often see backpackers carrying more stuff than what some of the local people OWN. The local people look in wonder at all the “stuff” these people have.

Take only a week’s worth of clothing and a minimum of a month’s worth of critical medicines or anything required for maintaining your health. One month should allow you enough time to source what you need.

TED’s Tips™ #2: Cash is your best friend in these situations. Take enough to buy what you need to get yourself started. That will be the topic of another post.

What’s up in China? Learn about a great internship program on offer if would like to Teach English in China

How to Teach English Overseas and Secrets to Success Abroad
TEFL Boot Camp  is offering a free download of their new publication Seven Secrets of Success Abroad - and along with it comes a bi-weekly installment and revision of their eBook called How to Teach English Overseas.

Great reviews for the Secrets of Success eBook – in spite of the hokey name – and the How to Teach English eBook is being updated and rewritten and sent out in installments as it is ready.

Here they are – click on the eBooks to get your FREE copies! Great information and the price is right, from our friends at TEFL Boot Camp – CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE EBOOKS.

HowToTeachOverseasCover

SevenSecretsCover

Please let me know what you think of the ebooks – use the comments section below.

I confess both eBooks are written by yours truly – hoping to inspire others to head overseas and live life BIG out in the real world. I would value your feedback!

Teaching English without Knowing the Local Language

What if I can’t speak Chinese, or Korean or ?

Local_7
What if I don’t speak the local language?
Can I still get hired to teach English?

** You won’t be required to know the local language **

What!? That’s right – and most EFL teachers don’t know the local language when they first arrive. Typically, native speaker EFL teachers are not given students that are true beginners. Usually, your students will have some English basics. Often not much, but enough for you to take them to higher levels and for you to be able to do some basic instruction in English.

How can I do that?

Your students will usually know enough of the English language – often about that of a two- or three-year-old native speaker. Really quite a lot, though they don’t usually feel very confident about their skills.

Your Native Speaker Language Skills . . .

are exactly why you are hired: Your accent, Your native ability to know what grammar is wrong or right, your ability know what sounds right or wrong in common usage.

Time and experience (or a good TEFL certification course) will give you the ability to explain these things – but in the beginning, even if you can’t explain it – you will still know what is wrong and what is right.

Should I use the local language when I teach English?

No! Your native ability with English is why you are hired. If you start teaching in the local language, you will not be much different from the local teachers of English, who are often paid much less than you will be. It is your native talent with English that makes you valuable.

Realize that learning a foreign language is a lot like learning to ride a bicycle. You have to do it. You can’t just talk about it and your students, before you get them, have usually “talked about it” for years and still only obtained minimal skills. That is exactly why they need YOU.

But, how will I find my way around and/or buy the things I need?

Not a problem. Most schools will assign another teacher or assistant to you, to help you do the things you need to do until you learn the basics. After all, you will most likely not be their first foreign teacher. Your school will likely be familiar with most of your wants and needs, from finding food you are familiar with, to cold remedies, Internet cafes, or even good restaurants.

After you live and work in a few countries, you will find yourself quite skilled at finding what you need, using either very basic language or even just gestures.

TED’s Tips™ #1: Learn a few basics before you go to any country, even if just on vacation. Please, thank you, excuse me and I am sorry – can go a long way in getting a foreigner to help you solve a problem or find what you need.

TED’s Tips™ #2: Learning to count and to ask how much and understand the answer are the second things to learn. Those skills can minimize misunderstandings and help you get out and about more.

What’s up in China? Learn what kind of jobs are on offer if would like to Teach English in China

How to Teach English Overseas and Secrets to Success Abroad
TEFL eBooks is offering a free download of their new publication Seven Secrets of Success Abroad - and along with it comes a bi-weekly installment and revision of their eBook called How to Teach English Overseas.

Great reviews for the Secrets of Success eBook – in spite of the hokey name – and the How to Teach English eBook is being updated and rewritten and sent out in installments as it is ready.

Here they are – click on the eBooks to get your FREE copies! Great information and the price is right, from our friends at TEFLeBooks.

HowToTeachOverseasCover

SevenSecretsCover

Please let me know what you think of the ebooks – use the comments section below.

I confess both eBooks are written by yours truly – hoping to inspire others to head overseas and live life BIG out in the real world. I would value your feedback!

Share your Experience with TEFL Newbie

We welcome guest articles from experienced teachers.

If you have something you feel is important to share – particularly with TEFL newbies or wannabes – we’d love to post it here for you.    We don’t think we know everything, so we are happy to perhaps learn more from you.

We are interested in POSITIVE stories about creating a successful life abroad.  We aren’t interested in personal drama or negative ninnys, creating blacklists or any other negative slop.    Life is already too full of that if you let it be that way.

We are about creating new lives abroad and how to make that happen.   By helping others, you help yourself in the big scheme of karma . . .

We are also interested in country profiles – an overview of the jobs scene in a specific country – IF you are working there or have worked there recently.

We also (as is probably obvious) enjoy a focus on cultural adaptation and how to succeed in a different work and living culture.

Requirements of a Guest Post

Sorry that we have to be so specific, but history says we must . . .

A minimum of 400 words are required and we prefer 500-600 words.  More is okay if there is meat on the bones.

Please write using English correctly.  Don’t submit something written in email short hand.  We don’t really have time to edit your work.  Inability to write properly probably means you should not be a teacher of English.

Links – unless to very authoritative websites – are not accepted.   Writing an article for TEFL Newbie to get a link to your blog or website is not what we are looking for.  We will not post it.  If you submit an article with such a link and we like the article – we will remove the link and post your article.  Fair warning!   If you don’t follow our wishes, we won’t follow yours.

Links again – absolutely, positively NO links to irrelevant sites.  That means no links to gambling or gaming sites, to any unrelated to teaching English abroad.  Don’t waste your time or ours by submitting articles with such links.  We DO read submissions.

We 100% reserve the right to accept submissions that we want and to reject those that do not interest us.    We are not interested in fights, debates or anything other than what we think our readers would like to know.  We might disagree about what they want to read and know – and in that case – our opinion is final.

Submit your article to Ted @ TEFLnewbie.com using ONLY a Word document.   Please put TEFL NEWBIE in the subject line.

My apologies, but some legal mumbo jumbo . . .  Terms and Conditions, etc.

Anything you write and that we publish becomes the property of TEFLnewbie.com

We are the sole deciders of if it remains on the site or is removed and if it should be edited or altered in any way.

By submitting your article to agree to the above conditions.

TWO WAYS . . .

There are two ways to go about this.  You may contact us and ask if we are interested in your topic and we will let you know OR you can just write it up and send it.   A well written article may convince us of something we would have rejected had we been asked.

Either way – send your inquiry or article (Word documents ONLY) to Ted @ TEFLnewbie.com – Again – Please put TEFL NEWBIE in the subject line.

 

 

 

Teaching English Abroad: A Lifestyle Opportunity

Teaching English Overseas is a Lifestyle Alternative

city view 2
Everything seems to be “lifestyle” these days . . . from people hustling condos and time shares to selling you a fancy watch you don’t really need.

But teaching English abroad is one REAL “lifestyle” opportunity that will have you experiencing the world firsthand and living your life from a totally different perspective, often only a few weeks from the time you make the decision to go. Nothing else in life really offers that dramatic of a change in possibilities.

If you truly want to experience something “different” and see the world from a different perspective, TEFL is your opportunity.

In my 20+ years abroad now, I’ve traveled and seen more of the world and spent more time on the world’s fabulous beaches than many of the so-called “rich and famous” that so many people envy. And that lifestyle is available to you.

The great thing about the lifestyle is that you get to experience people, cultures and countries on a far deeeper level than a tourist or “traveler” that is really only passing through. You get to “rub shoulders” and share your work day, lunchtime and social times with the very people that give the world its diversity and keep things interesting.

You get the opportunity to have a much deeper understanding of their cultures and languages rather than just the curiosities mentioned in the travel guides.

And how much does it all cost?

Cost?! They PAY you! That’s a deal that can’t be beat.

TED’s Tips™ #1: Living and working abroad teaching English is not for everyone, but if you have an strong and insatiable interest in the world and its peoples, this is exactly where you should be.

TED’s Tips™ #2: Embrace Life! Get out there and KNOW and EXPERIENCE the real world, not the plastic fear-place presented on TV.

What’s up in China? Learn about a great internship program on offer if would like to Teach English in China

How to Teach English Overseas and Secrets to Success Abroad
TEFL Boot Camp  is offering a free download of their new publication Seven Secrets of Success Abroad - and along with it comes a bi-weekly installment and revision of their eBook called How to Teach English Overseas.

Great reviews for the Secrets of Success eBook – in spite of the hokey name – and the How to Teach English eBook is being updated and rewritten and sent out in installments as it is ready.

Here they are – click on the eBooks to get your FREE copies! Great information and the price is right, from our friends at TEFL Boot Camp – CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE EBOOKS.

HowToTeachOverseasCover

SevenSecretsCover

Please let me know what you think of the ebooks – use the comments section below.

I confess both eBooks are written by yours truly – hoping to inspire others to head overseas and live life BIG out in the real world. I would value your feedback!

Who Teaches English Abroad: and Why?

Who_wo6

Who might your fellow teachers of English be?

A very wide variety of people!

You will be quite surprised – maybe even shocked.

Who are they?

To a large extent they are people just like you. People who saw an interesting opportunity and took it.

Recently I went out for dinner with an experienced lawyer from Chicago who had just finished his TEFL certification course.

I’ve met other former lawyers, a hotel manager, tennis instructor, construction worker, retired military people, social workers, business managers, a factory manager, a ship’s pilot, journalists, psychotherapists, retail sales staff, public school teachers, retired people, a petroleum engineer, and many more.

And those are only the ones I asked! After a while – you won’t even be surprised any more!

Why are they teaching EFL overseas?

Why not! You will sometimes hear people talking about “running away from it all” and “escaping America” (or other countries). But more often people are running to what they see as an interesting and exciting lifestyle opportunity. Fulfillment of a dream of actually experiencing the world, rather than just seeing it through the window of a tour bus or a television. Their reasons are often as varied as the people themselves.

Why do they stay overseas?

Now that’s the hard question. Mostly because they are enjoying themselves, meeting their personal and financial goals, and just don’t feel the need to go home. I recently retired abroad. Did I start out with that goal? No. But I love it!

Most people do go home permanently at some point, but there is a small percentage of us who find the lifestyle just too enjoyable to go back “home.” For me – now – “home” is a wonderful tropical island that I may never leave!

TED’s Tips™ #1: Explore your own motivations for wanting to live and work abroad. But realize it doesn’t have to be a “heavy” decision. It can just be one of joyous curiosity.

TED’s Tips™ #2: If you regularly visit a forum where people discuss living and working abroad, ask about what people did BEFORE they went. You will likely be very surprised.

What’s up in China? Learn what kind of jobs are on offer if would like to Teach English in China

How to Teach English Overseas and Secrets to Success Abroad
TEFL Boot Camp is offering a free download of their new publication Seven Secrets of Success Abroad - and along with it comes a bi-weekly installment and revision of their eBook called How to Teach English Overseas.

Great reviews for the Secrets of Success eBook – in spite of the hokey name – and the How to Teach English eBook is being updated and rewritten and sent out in installments as it is ready.

Here they are – click on the eBooks to get your FREE copies! Great information and the price is right, from our friends at TEFL Boot Camp.

HowToTeachOverseasCover

SevenSecretsCover

Please let me know what you think of the ebooks – use the comments section below.

I confess both eBooks are written by yours truly – hoping to inspire others to head overseas and live life BIG out in the real world. I would value your feedback!